Matilda FitzThomas / Lady Maud Fitz Thomas

everyonedeservesapage.com british empire origin
Born: About 1270 Fitz Thomas Coat of Arms
Died: Shortly before November 27, 1328
Siblings:
  1. Otes Fitz Thomas
  2. Joan Fitz Thomas
  3. Beatrice Fitz Thomas
  4. Sir William de Munchensy
Spouse(s): John de Botetourt, 1st Baron Botetourt
Notable Descendants:

from fabpedigree.com

U.S. President's 15-Great Grandmother. HRH Charles's 20-Great Grandmother. PM Churchill's 19-Great Grandmother. Lady Diana's 19-Great Grandmother. P.M. Cameron's 20-Great Grandmother. Poss. `Osawatomie' Brown's 15-Great Grandmother

 

 
Family Overview           Otes Fitz William of Belchamp => Ancestors 1
        Sir Thomas FitzOtes

/

\

     
Children
    /     GRANDMOTHER => Ancestors 2
  1. Sir Thomas Botetourt
  2. Sir John Botetourt, Knight Banneret
  3. Sir Otes Botetourt
  4. Robert Botetourt
  5. Joan Botetourt
  6. Ada Botetourt
  7. Elizabeth Botetourt
<= Matilda            
      \     Sir William de Beauchamp => Ancestors 3
        Beatrice de Beauchamp

/

\

     
            Ida Longespee => Royal Line

 

Timeline

Maud Fitz Thomas, born about 1269-72 (aged 26 in 1295, and 30 in 1302).

Married before June 1282, to John Botetourt (Buteturte, Boutecourte, Botecourt, Butecourt), Knight, of Little Ellingham and Upton, Norfolk, Great Bradley, Suffolk, etc., and, in right of his wife, of Mendlesham, Suffolk, Bromham, Cardington, Dilewick, Renhold, and Wootton, Bedfordshire, Linstade, Buckinghamshire, Hamerton, Huntingdonshire, Shelsley Beauchamp, Worcestershire, etc.

He was Admiral of the North Fleet, Warden of the Forest of Dean, which is part of St. Briavels Castle, where he was Constable between 1291-1308. The wood from the forest was used in the castle for making quarrels, which are the arrows used in crossbows.

He was Governor of Framlingham Castle, son and heir of Guy Botetourt, Knight, of Little Ellingham, Cantley, Cranworth, Fishley, Kimberley, Upton, and Woodrising, Norfolk, by his wife, Ada.

They had four sons, Thomas, Knight, John, K.B. (knight bannerett?), Otes, Knight, and Robert, and three daughters, Joan, Ada, and Elizabeth.

He began his household career as a falconer in the 1270s.

His first campaign was in Wales in 1282 as a squire of the household.

Maud was co-heiress in 1283 to her brother, Otes Fitz Thomas, and sole heiress in 1285 to her sister, Joan, wife of Guy Ferre, by which she inherited the hereditary office of coiner of the Mint, together with the manors of Mendlesham, Suffolk, Belchamp Otton, Gestingthorpe, and Gosfield, Essex, Woodmancote, Gloucestershire, Hamerton, Huntingdonshire, Shelsley Beauchamp, Worcestershire, and a one-third share of the barony of Bedford, Bedfordshire.

In 1286 he claimed view of frankpledge and free warren in Hamerton, Huntingdonshire.

Sometime in the period, 1291-1302, Maud was heiress to her cousin, Joan, daughter of Hugh Fitz Otes, Knight, by which she inherited the manor of Isenhampstead (in Chesham), Buckinghamshire.

In 1292-3, he was a justice of gaol delivery in Warwickshire and Leicestershire.

In 1294, when the king faced the threat of French galleys raiding the south coast of England, he appointed two household knights, William de Leybourne, and John Botetourt as captain and sub-captain of the fleet. In the following year, they were described as admirals - the first use of the term in England.

In 1296, he commanded 94 ships taken from ports between Harwich and King's Lynn, the great majority from Yarmouth.

In 1298 and 1299, he served on four commissions of oyer and terminer.

In 1298, he had letters of protection for one year, he then going to Scotland. He was accompanied in that campaign by his younger brother, Guy Botetourt, and his valet, William Botetourt.

In 1300 he complained William de Wolcherchehaw, taverner, beat one of his carters and did "other enormities;" the defendant came into court and pledged a cask of wine to him.

He was present at the siege of Caerlavercock in 1300; the metrical chronicler of that siege described him as "light of heart and doing good to all."

The same year, he was appointed one of three commissioners to inquire into cases of exportation of sterling money, gold and silver, plate, wool, etc., and the exchange of the same for base coin, which was imported into England and unlawfully changed.

He signed the Barons' letter to Pope Boniface VIII in 1301.

In 1304, he led a raid into Nithsdale with 130 cavalry and 1,770 infantry.

The same year, the King ordered him to assist Robert de Brus, then on the English side, in transporting one great engine in preparation of the siege train for the siege of Stirling in Scotland.

He was summoned to Parliament from 13 July 1305, to 13 Sept. 1324, by writs directed Johanni Botetourt, whereby he may be held to have become Lord Botetourt.

In 1305, he was appointed one of the justices of trailbaston.

In the same year, he was sent to treat with the Scots on the affairs of that kingdom.

In 1306, he enrolled himself as performing the service of one knight in Scotland, but in fact he had a contigent of three knights and eleven squires with him.

In 1307, he again commanded a raid against the Scots.

Sometime before 1309-10, he and Maud conveyed land in Linslade, Buckinghamshire to William Rous.

In 1309-10, William Fitz Walter conveyed the manor of Great Bradley, Suffolk to him and his wife, Maud.

In 1310, he obtained a license to alienate lands and rents in Mendlesham, Suffolk in mortmain to the value of 100s. for a chaplain to celebrate in Mendlesham church.

In 1311, he and his wife, Maud, were granted the reversion of the manors of Fulbourn, Cambridgeshire and Great Carbrooke, Norfolk by Baldwin de Manners, Knight, who died childless in 1320. John sold the former manor to William la Zouche Mortimer, Knight, Lord Zouche, and Alice his wife in 1323; the latter manor was held in 1327 by John Botetourt's son-in-law, William le Latimer.

In 1312, John Botetourt and several others were granted letters of safe conduct by the King to confer in London with Arnold, Cardinal of St. Prisca, and Louis, Count of Évreux, who were sent to help effect a reconcilliation between Kind Edward II and the disaffected earls.

In 1314, he commanded the fleet employed in the expedition against Scotland. The same year, Peter de Burgate, Knight, released all his right in the manor of Mendlesham, Suffolk to him and his wife, Maud.

In 1315, he complained that those recruited for his company were "feeble chaps, not strong enough, not properly dressed, and lacking bows and arrows."

In 1316, he presented his brother, Master Roger Botetourt, as rector of Great Bradley, Suffolk.

In 1318, he again presented to the church of Great Bradley, Suffolk. The same year, he and his wife, Maud, complained that Richard, Abbot of Saint Edmunds, William de Cleye, and many others came to Tivetshall, Norfolk, where Maud and some of the servants of the said John were lodged, maliciously raised a hue and cry against them, expelled the said Maud and the servants from the inn, carried away the goods of the said John, and assaulted the said servants. Either he or his grandson, John Botetourt, was heir sometime after 1318-19 to his brother, William Botetourt, by which he inherited the manor of Cantley, Norfolk.

In 1319, he and his wife Maud sold the manor of Woodmancote, Gloucestershire, to Robert de Swynburn.

In 1320, he obtained a license to alienate one acre of land in Fishley, Norfolk, together with the advowson of amoiety of the church of Fishley, Norfolk, to the Prior and Convent of Saint Mary's, Weybridge, and for them to appropriate the said moiety, to find a chaplain to celebrate divine services for the soul of the said John and the souls of his ancestors.

In 1321, he and Maud sold the manor of Shelsley Beauchamp, Worcestershire, to John de Wysham, Knight, and his wife, Hawise de Poynings; in 1322-3, he conveyed the manor and advowson of the church of Little Ellingha, Norfolk, to the same couple.

John joined the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, and fought at the Battle of Boroughbridge, 16 March 1321/2. He was subsequently fined £1000, and received a pardon October 8, 1322.

In 1323, he and his wife Maud conveyed the manor of Isenhampstead (in Chesham), Buckinghamshire, to Hugh le Despenser the Younger, but, on Hugh's execution and attainder in 1326, the manor escheated to the crown and custody was re-granted to Maud Botetourt.

In 1323-4, they made a settlement of the manor of Great Carbrooke, Norfolk, evidently in connection with the marriage of their daughter, Elizabeth, to William le Latimer, as William was lord of this manor in 1327.

In 1324, John paid the Italian bankers, the Peruzzi, 100 marks, evidently in payment of a debt he owed to Hugh le Despenser the Younger.

Sir John, 1st Lord Botetourt, died November 25, 1324.

In 1325, Maud sued Andrew de Bures, Robert de Bures and his wife Hillary, and John de Wysham and his wife Hawise, for one third part of the manor of Little Ellingham, Norfolk, which she claimed as her dower.

In 1327, she likewise sued Robert, son of John Botetourt, John de Wynchestre and others, regarding unspecified land in Suffolk.

In 1328, she obtained a license to enfeoff Master William Artoys of a messuage and land in Renhold, Bedfordshire.

On November 12, 1328, she obtained a license to convey to her daughter and son-in-law, Elizabeth and William le Latimer, her share of the barony of Bedford, Bedfordshire, including the manors of Bromham, Cardington, Dilewick, Renhold, and Wootton, Bedfordshire.

Maud, Lady Botetourt, died shortly before November 27, 1328.

In May 1329, her son-in-law, William le Latimer, was pardoned for having previously purchased from her, without license, the hereditary office of coiner of the Mint.

In 1330, John and Maud's son, Otes Botetourt, obtained a license to alienate in mortmain a messuage, 30 acres of land, and 30s. in rent in Mendlesham, Suffolk, to a chaplain to celebrate divine services in the parish church of Mendlesham for the souls of his parents.

Married once, before June 1292

1329 she sold the office of graver and worker of the dies in the Tower of London and city of Canterbury to her son-in-law, William le Latimer

buried in St Mary the Virgin, Belchamp Walter, Essex

 

Lived In

Married before June 1282, to John Botetourt (Buteturte, Boutecourte, Botecourt, Butecourt), Knight, of Little Ellingham and Upton, Norfolk, Great Bradley, Suffolk, etc., and, in right of his wife, of Mendlesham, Suffolk, Bromham, Cardington, Dilewick, Renhold, and Wootton, Bedfordshire, Linstade, Buckinghamshire, Hamerton, Huntingdonshire, Shelsley Beauchamp, Worcestershire, etc.

st biavels castle gatehouse

 

 

Sources/Reference
The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Edinburgh, 1977, Paget, Gerald, Reference: vol 1 18

 

Information compiled by Darryl Murdoch, Ontario, Canada. If you have any notes, corrections, additions, etc., feel free to contact me, darryl at darrylerickson dot com. Since I'm not in the UK, I'm always eager to see copies of documents, or portraits locked away in manor houses, etc.